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About Retention Pond Maintenance

Proper water management is necessary to maintain a healthy and productive commercial property. However, poor water management can lead to water-related issues, such as stormwater runoff, polluting water, eroding soil, and floods. Retention ponds can be used to combat these problems.

Proper maintenance of retention ponds is essential to ensure their long-term viability, safety, and ability to reduce pollution. So, what is the retention pond maintenance?

What Is a Retention Pond?

Retention ponds are long-term, artificial ponds used to collect and process stormwater runoff. Water is permanently stored in these structures, which are usually surrounded by vegetation. It is then drained away into a larger river or reservoir. When a storm hits, the pond's water level drops, reducing the danger of flooding and saving the community money on repairs.

Why is Retention Pond Maintenance Important?

Stormwater runoff from residential areas, roadways, parking lots, industrial sites, and commercial sectors may be improved by using retention ponds to temporarily store water during severe storms, reducing peak stormwater runoff rates. Retention pond upkeep is essential to ensure that they continue to perform effectively.

For both businesses and homes, preventative maintenance is essential because it protects the stability of downstream channels, keeps water quality high, eliminates unpleasant smells and troublesome insects, and preserves the area's appearance.

Improperly managed retention ponds may increase pollutant flow downstream, increase the instability of downstream channels, increase the danger of downstream floods, and create different aesthetic or nuisance concerns.

What Are the Actions Needed to Maintain Retention Ponds?

A terrific way to make the most of your outside space is to install a retention pond. The most critical preventative actions are to maintain your pond in excellent operating order and avoid more severe issues. By following a few basic guidelines, you can keep your pond in peak condition.

Inspections
Stormwater pond inspections should be conducted as part of a comprehensive stormwater management strategy. Inspectors should have a complete list of items to look for after rain, including obstacles, garbage buildup, erosion, and sedimentation.

Vegetation Control
Mowing around the drainage pond helps avoid erosion and looks nice. To prevent pollution in the future, businesses and property owners should use as little fertilizer and pesticides as possible.

Removal of Sediments
The bottom of the outflow structure must be cleaned every six months to eliminate the silt that has built up over time. Check the pond depth at various points throughout this procedure. If the pond's original design depth has been reduced by more than 25 percent, the sediment should be removed.

Structural Repair and Replacement
A stormwater pond's structural components will need to be repaired or replaced. A stormwater specialist may determine it.

Who Is in Charge of Maintaining the Retention Pond?

A city is liable for any retention ponds located in the public right-of-way or property controlled by the city. The property owner, property management firm, or community homeowners' association (HOA) is responsible for any runoff on their land. Because of this, your HOA or property management firm should take care of any retention ponds in your neighborhood, business park, or retail center.

Working with a professional landscaping firm to improve and manage your retention pond will ensure that it complies with all municipal and county rules and standards. The city and county will carry out annual or biennial inspections. Because of this, the ponds must satisfy all specifications and operate at their maximum capacity.

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About Douglasville, Georgia

Located along a natural rise in the topography, Douglasville was originally known as "Skint Chestnut." The name was derived from a large tree used by Native Americans as a landmark; it was stripped of its bark so as to be more conspicuous.

Douglasville was founded in 1874 as the railroad was constructed in the area. That same year, Douglasville was designated as the county seat of the recently formed Douglas County. The community was named for Senator Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois.

Georgia General Assembly first incorporated Douglasville in 1875.

On September 21, 2009, Douglas County was devastated by the worst flood in Georgia history. Over 18 inches (457 mm) of rain fell in one night, destroying many roads and homes. The county was later declared a disaster area, and the governor of Georgia declared a state of emergency. The flooding most affected the areas of Douglasville, Villa Rica, Austell, Lithia Springs, and Chapel Hill. The disaster killed more than eight people in the county, most of them in the Douglasville area.

Douglasville is located in north-central Douglas County at 33°44′59″N 84°43′23″W / 33.74972°N 84.72306°W / 33.74972; -84.72306Coordinates: 33°44′59″N 84°43′23″W / 33.74972°N 84.72306°W / 33.74972; -84.72306 (33.749824, −84.723190). Lithia Springs is 6 miles (10 km) to the northeast along U.S. Route 78, and Villa Rica is 10 miles (16 km) to the west. Hiram is 9 miles (14 km) to the north via SR 92. Interstate 20 passes south of downtown, leading east 22 miles (35 km) to downtown Atlanta and west 125 miles (201 km) to Birmingham, Alabama. I-20 provides access to the city from exits 34, 36, and 37.

According to the United States Census Bureau, Douglasville has a total area of 22.6 square miles (58.5 km), of which 22.5 square miles (58.2 km2) is land and 0.1 square miles (0.3 km), or 0.58%, is water.

Douglasville has an elevation of 1,209 ft (369 m) above sea level.

As of the 2020 United States Census, there were 34,650 people, 12,675 households, and 7,833 families residing in the city.

As of the census of 2010, there were 30,961 people, 11,627 households, and 7,692 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,376 inhabitants per square mile (531/km). There were 13,163 housing units at an average density of 585.0 per square mile (225.9/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 55.9% African American, 36.0% White (33.4% Non-Hispanic White), 0.2% Native American, 1.8% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 3.3% from other races, and 2.8% from two or more races. 7.2% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 11,627 households, out of which 36.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.3% were married couples living together, 21.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.8% were non-families. 28.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.18.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 28.3% under the age of 18, 9.5% from 18 to 24, 33.2% from 25 to 44, 22.2% from 45 to 64, and 6.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32.7 years. For every 100 females, there were 87.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 83.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $47,596, and the median income for a family was $54,375. Males had a median income of $45,933 versus $39,675 for females. The per capita income for the city was $26,002. 15.9% of the population and 14.1% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 22.2% of those under the age of 18 and 15.1% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line.

As of the census of 2000, there were 20,065 people, 7,286 households, and 5,078 families residing in the city. The population density was 938.5 inhabitants per square mile (362.4/km). There were 7,903 housing units at an average density of 369.6 per square mile (142.7/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 63.84% White, 30.29% African American, 0.31% Native American, 1.73% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 1.69% from other races, and 2.13% from two or more races. 3.99% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 7,286 households, out of which 38.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.2% were married couples living together, 16.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.3% were non-families. 22.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.16.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 28.3% under the age of 18, 11.1% from 18 to 24, 34.4% from 25 to 44, 19.6% from 45 to 64, and 6.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.0 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $45,289, and the median income for a family was $52,340. Males had a median income of $37,464 versus $27,038 for females. The per capita income for the city was $22,283. 12.2% of the population and 10.1% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 17.3% of those under the age of 18 and 8.1% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line.