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About Driveway Paving

The driveway paving job can be a daunting task to undertake. The options available for you are limited, and often what you do decide to use will depend upon the existing surrounding area. For those who live in a rural setting, such as those who live on the countryside, there is little options to get the driveway ready for the caravans coming through. In this case, it will be necessary to use natural stones or cement in the driveway.

Pavers are not always the best choice of material for a driveway paving project. While they may look like natural stone and act as a wonderful contrast to the darker, earthy tones of the soil, they cannot be properly maintained without the right sealer. Sealer comes in different types, and can be tailored to perfectly match the look and feel of your driveway paving project. If you do not want to invest in driveway pavers, then there are other options you can take into consideration.

One of which is interlocking paving, which allows you to have beautifully crafted interlocking pavers installed for your driveway paving projects. This is ideal for driveways, which are in need of repairs. The pavers lock together with the help of interlocking joints, and thus you need not exert any effort in driving the pavers apart. The advantage of this system is that you will save a lot of money that you would have otherwise had to spend on hiring workers to do the job for you.

Another option you have when it comes to driveway paving is asphalt driveway paving. There are many advantages when it comes to using asphalt versus concrete for your driveway paving project. First, asphalt is an excellent material for use on the outside of homes. It is extremely durable and will outlast concrete, even when it is left outdoors for quite some time.

In addition to this, there are also several concrete driveway paving pros that you should know about. For one thing, concrete does cost a little bit more than the other alternative materials like asphalt and brick driveway paving stones. However, you can always count on its longevity and resistance towards all types of weather. Moreover, you will not be required to spend a lot of time in treating the concrete once it gets cracked. Concrete cracks usually get repaired by applying a special cement mixture to fix the damage. You can also choose from a variety of designs for the pavers of your driveway.

On the other hand, brick driveway paving pros include the fact that you will no longer have to worry about finding the right pattern for the exterior of your home. Bricks come in a wide array of colors, shapes and sizes, so you will always be able to find the right design to complement the architecture of your house. Pavers that are made out of natural stone come at a much higher price, but they are also far more durable compared to the composite materials such as asphalt. Finally, you will not have to spend a lot of time and effort in order to keep the driveway clean and free from damage, as concrete usually requires very little maintenance.

Driveway paving is a very important process if you want to improve the appearance and value of your home. It is a very practical choice, because it allows you to create a more attractive space that can make your home look more appealing. Of course, it is essential to keep in mind that not all of your driveways need to be paved. In fact, there are many instances where the only purpose of having a paved driveway is for the sake of improving the curb appeal of the property.

Asphalt and concrete driveways are two of the most common types of driveway paving materials, although there are some homeowners who prefer the use of rubber for driveways. Regardless of what you decide on, you should always remember that you should always choose the material wisely. Concrete and asphalt are both excellent choices, but the effectiveness of each material can vary greatly. Paved driveways can be used on nearly any surface, although they are typically best used on asphalt or concrete surfaces. Ultimately, it all comes down to your personal preference and budget.

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About Milton, Georgia

A citizens' committee was formed in 2005 to help determine the viability of incorporating unincorporated northern Fulton County. After debate, the Georgia State House and Senate approved a bill creating the city of Milton on March 9, 2006. On March 28, Governor Sonny Perdue signed the bill into law. In July 2006, voters approved a ballot referendum on July 18 by more than 86%. On August 4, 2006, Governor Perdue appointed a five-person commission to serve as the interim government of Milton (composed of Ron Wallace, Brandon Beach, Gregory Mishkin, Dan Phalan and Cecil Pruitt ) . Milton adopted the existing county ordinances on December 1, 2006.

Milton occupies the northern tip of Fulton County -- bounded on the south by the cities of Roswell and Alpharetta, on the east by Forsyth County and Alpharetta, and on the north and west by Cherokee County. The City's latest Comprehensive Plan divides Milton into eight "character areas" that each have, to some degree, their own unique attributes; they are Arnold Mill, Bethany, Birmingham, Central Milton, Crabapple, Deerfield, Milton Lakes and Sweetapple.

The two major north-south roads that run through Milton are State Route 9 (in the city's southeast) and State Route 372 (more central), which is also known as Birmingham Highway. State Route 140 (Arnold Mill Road) is on the southwest part of Milton.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the city of Milton has a total area of 39.2 square miles (101.4 km), of which 38.5 square miles (99.8 km2) is land and 0.62 square miles (1.6 km), or 1.59%, is water. The elevation ranges from 950 to 1,280 feet (290 to 390 m) above sea level.

As of April 2007, the US Postal Service recognizes Milton as a valid alias for ZIP code 30004, which is served from the Alpharetta post office.

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 41,296 people, 13,540 households, and 10,366 families residing in the city.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau (and its 2019 American Community Survey), the population of Milton is 39,587. The city is 73.2% white, 12.9% Asian (8.3% Indian, 2.3% Chinese, 0.3% Filipino, 0.2% Japanese, 1.2% Korean, 0.1% Vietnamese, 0.5% other Asian), 11.3% black or African American, and 5.9% Hispanic or Latino of any race (2.4% Mexican, 1.4% Puerto Rican, 0.5% Cuban, 1.5% "Other Hispanic or Latino"), and 0.1% Native American. Some 28.5% of Milton's population is under 18 years old, while 8.3% is age 65 and over.

Milton is one of the wealthiest cities in the state of Georgia with a median household income of $128,559. Between 2015-2019, 76.4% of people (or an immediate family member) in Milton owned their home; the median value of such housing units was $541,000. Approximately 3.5% of the population lives below the poverty line. The vast majority of Milton is part of the ZIP code 30004, which has an average household income of $99,412.

In terms of education, 96.4% of those age 25 and above are (at least) high school graduates while 70.9% have a bachelor's degree or higher. Some 68.8% of those age 16 and over have jobs, with the mean commuting time for work being 29.5 minutes.