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About Asphalt Sealcoating

Asphalt Sealcoating, Atlanta, Marietta, Peachtree City, Alpharetta

Buckhead Paving provides Atlanta and surrounding cities with quality asphalt repair and asphalt sealcoating services. Buckhead crews perform both large and small sealcoating projects. Our crews are available day or night to work around your business hours of operation. Please contact us (678) 540-2345 for a free pavement evaluation.

Asphalt sealcoating not only makes your parking lot or driveway look new again, but when applied correctly helps protect against harmful elements such as gas and oil leaks and the sun’s ultraviolet rays. Sealcoating material is normally applied in two coats and allowed to cure for a day before asphalt striping paint is applied. Sealcoating should be applied every two years or as the surface shows signs of graying out. Sealcoating is much less expensive than complete removal and replacement of pavement.

Asphalt is a cost-effective pavement solution and offers years of service when maintained properly. Over time, the binder in asphalt begins to degrade and your asphalt surfaces may begin to crack, chip, or erode. A sealcoat can help protect your surfaces from damage and prolong the service life of your asphalt surface. Not all sealcoating options are the same. We can help you select the best sealcoating technique for your surface to give you the most durable surface possible and keep your asphalt surfaces looking and working great.

Asphalt Sealing, or sealcoating, is simply the process of laying a thin protective layer over asphalt-based pavement to give it a protective layer of protection against the elements: oil, water, and U.V. The positive effects of asphalt sealing have long been debated. Some claim that asphalt sealing increases the lifespan of the pavement, but again, there’s no evidence that backs up those claims. In fact, asphalt sealing can actually damage the pavement by creating cracks. The excessive water and oil that can be soaked into the asphalt also weaken its structural integrity. And, the chemical fumes emitted during asphalt sealing can also be harmful to humans.

With all of that in mind, it’s not surprising that a lot of business owners, when they set out to perform asphalt sealing, opt to go the non-per square foot route. For one thing, the costs are much lower, often no more than a few cents per square foot. And, the benefits of lower cost and improved performance are well-known. After all, if you want to save money, you want to reduce your operation costs, right?

Contact us with your sealcoating needs and let us help you select the most effective and affordable solution for your traffic needs. We have equipment and experience with all types of sealcoat application and our knowledgeable tradesmen keep up with changing technologies and techniques. Contact our services today to request an estimate on your sealcoating project and let us get to work for you.

Workers applying blacktop sealer to asphalt street using a spray to provide a protective coat against the elements

About Acworth, Georgia

Like the rest of Cobb County, the area now containing Acworth was carved out of the former Cherokee Nation in 1831 after the natives were expelled.

The Western and Atlantic Railroad was completed through town in 1840. A watering station for the locomotives was established there.

The town received its current name in 1843 from Western & Atlantic Railroad engineer Joseph L. Gregg, who named it for his hometown of Acworth, New Hampshire, which was named for the former Royal Navy Surveyor Sir Jacob Acworth.

Telegraph lines reached the town in 1851.

A private school was opened for white students in 1852. A newer private school operated from 1899 to 1935, when they integrated with the Cobb County School District. Until 1935, high school students from Acworth paid tuition to attend. Students outside the town were subsidized by the Cobb County School Board. Black students were educated separately in a grammar school. The closest Black high school was in Atlanta. Later, students were bused by the county to a segregated school in Marietta.

Acworth was incorporated on December 1, 1860.

Volunteers to fight in the Civil War enlisted in what became Company A ("Acworth Infantry") in the 18th Georgia Volunteer Infantry and Company C ("Invincibles") in the 41st Georgia Volunteer Infantry.

The town was captured by the Union June 6, 1864. The city was called "Little Shanty" by the Union troops, to contrast it with the next town south, "Big Shanty", since renamed Kennesaw. The town was under martial law during the six months of occupation. On November 13, 1864, the town was burned down by the army of General W. T. Sherman, sparing 12 homes and one church; its citizens were left destitute.

The town had nearly recovered by the 1880s. Cotton farming in the area peaked from the 1890s through the 1920s. Low prices during the Great Depression resulted in a cessation of cotton farming in the area and throughout Cobb County.

During segregation, the railroad tracks served as a racial divide, with African Americans living to the northeast of the tracks and the whites to the southwest. There were few common public events. When a movie theater was erected in the 1930s, Blacks were allowed to access the balcony from a separate entrance. Whites sat on the main floor.

Volunteers formed a fire department in 1907.

There were eventually a total of three textile mills in town from 1905 through the 1980s. They employed about 800 workers at their peak.

In 1926, Main Street was paved. When the entire Dixie Highway (old U.S. Route 41 and part of the Cherokee Peachtree Trail) was paved in 1929, over 800 tourist vehicles entered the city daily.

When the Etowah River was dammed, forming Lake Allatoona, citizens feared that land near the town would become a swamp. They successfully petitioned for a second dam, resulting in Lake Acworth in the 1950s. This became a tourist attraction.

The town made a major improvement in its water and sewage lines in the late 1940s.

The city elected its first woman mayor, Mary McCall, in 1956 and 1961–66.

African-American students were schooled separately from white children until 1967.

Acworth was recognized as a 2010 All-America City Award winner by the National Civic League.

In 2011, the filming of several scenes for the Footloose remake took place in downtown Acworth. The Acworth Presbyterian Church was used as the primary church, and the house of Mayor Tommy Allegood was used as Julianne Hough's character's home.

In 2017, the city was the site of the WWA Wakeboarding National Championship.

Acworth is located in the foothills of the North Georgia mountains along the southeastern banks of Lake Acworth and Lake Allatoona on the Etowah River. It is bordered by the city of Kennesaw to the southeast and by Bartow and Cherokee counties to the north.

Interstate 75 runs through the northern part of the city in Cherokee and Bartow counties, with access from exits 277 and 278. Via I-75, downtown Atlanta is 34 mi (55 km) southeast, and Chattanooga, Tennessee, is 88 mi (142 km) northwest. U.S. Route 41 and Georgia State Route 92 also run through the city, with GA-92 leading east 12 mi (19 km) to Woodstock, and south 18 mi (29 km) to Hiram. US-41 runs to the west of the city, leading southeast 6 mi (10 km) to Kennesaw, Georgia and northwest 12 mi (19 km) to Cartersville.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 8.8 square miles (22.7 km), of which 8.3 square miles (21.4 km2) is land and 0.54 square miles (1.4 km), or 6.05%, is water.

Unincorporated areas considered Acworth for mailing purposes extend into southeast Bartow County, southwest Cherokee County, and northeast Paulding County. Some of the incorporated portions of Acworth east of Nance Road and Acworth Due West Road have a Kennesaw mailing address.

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 22,440 people, 8,337 households, and 5,470 families residing in the city.

As of the census of 2000, there were 13,422 people, 5,194 households, and 3,589 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,896.9 inhabitants per square mile (732.4/km2). There were 5,453 housing units at an average density of 770.7 per square mile (297.6/km). The racial makeup of the city was 79.7% White, 12.6% African American, 0.2% Native American, 2.3% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 3.2% from other races, and 2.00% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.05% of the population.

There were 5,194 households, out of which 37.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.9% were married couples living together, 10.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.9% were non-families. 23.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.08.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 27.0% under the age of 18, 9.0% from 18 to 24, 41.0% from 25 to 44, 15.7% from 45 to 64, and 7.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females, there were 95.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.6 males.