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About Asphalt Paving

Paving Contractor Atlanta, GA

At Buckhead Paving (678) 540-2345, our aim is to serve our clientele in the most efficient way with the best work possible. Your money cannot be wasted or misused in trying economic times.

Asphalt Paving Contractors

Asphalt is our strong suit. As asphalt paving contractors, we specialize in all asphalt projects, particularly driveways and parking lots. Our team knows the ins and outs because of the years of experience working within this field.

Concrete Paving Contractors

Concrete is also a Buckhead specialty. We are extremely familiar with concrete and work with it on a regular basis. As concrete paving contractors, we often use concrete to install driveways, sidewalks, patios, pool decks, sports courts, parking areas, commercial walkways, and amid industrial areas. Concrete is lasting and can be colored, stained, and stamped for adding to your decorative design.

Paving Services Provided Atlanta

Being Atlanta’s paving contractor of choice we provide a number of paving services and a variety of paving projects. This means we have the ability to repair existing surfaces, as well as the means to replace them. We are able to communicate with our customers and make sure they are satisfied with any asphalt or concrete project they choose.

Some paving services/projects we provide include:

  1. Crack-filling
  2. Striping Pavement/Parking Lots
  3. Pothole Repair
  4. Sealing Pavement
  5. Pavement Replacement/Overlays
  6. New Pavement Pouring/Finishing
  7. Concrete & Asphalt Maintenance
  8. Drainage Repair/Grading
  9. New Driveways
  10. Driveway Replacements
  11. Parking Lots
  12. Pavement Overlays
  13. Sidewalks
  14. Patios
  15. Walkways/Commercial Areas
  16. Pool Decks
  17. Drainage Flumes

Please give us a quick call today, for your free estimate.

Asphalt paving is one of the most commonly used forms of construction today. This is due to its high adaptability and low cost. In addition, it is also considered to be a very practical option when it comes to home paving. However, it does have certain shortcomings that need to be taken note of. Read on to know about some of these and consider whether you should opt for asphalt or not.

One of the disadvantages of using an asphalt driveway is that it can be quite slippery. You need to make sure, therefore, that you drive your car carefully on it. And even if you do so, there is still a chance of your vehicle getting stuck on the asphalt. So, you should keep a good grip on the steering wheel and use all the available help you can. This is especially important if you are making a long distance drive.

There is also a possibility that asphalt might damage the surface underneath if it is not properly sealed. This is because asphalt is a petroleum product and petroleum products can cause damage to the environment. Therefore, you should make sure that the paved area is adequately sealed to make sure that it does not erode.

It is also important to remember that asphalt can crack when it gets too wet. If this happens, you will need to replace the area with new asphalt so that it does not get cracked again in future. Otherwise, you may end up spending more on repairing cracks that you have caused. In fact, asphalt cracks can be a real headache especially during heavy rains when the paver becomes very susceptible to water penetration.

Apart from this, asphalt is also susceptible to cracking when it is exposed to heat. This is especially true during summer months when the temperature is high. During this period, it is possible for the asphalt to get very soft and mushy. When this happens, it is much harder to seal the surface properly and repair any cracks that have developed.

Another problem that can occur with an asphalt paver is when it is being used improperly. For instance, when the asphalt paver is being used to pave driveways, it can easily grind over the edges of the driveway. The grout lines might also get damaged during this process. In fact, there are some homeowners who prefer using concrete or paved paths in front of their homes and driveways. However, they often forget that they should also seal these paths. Sealing the pathways will help to keep them protected from debris, grit, water and sand.

Homeowners should therefore find a qualified company to clean up their asphalt paver once in a while. These professionals will use a pressure washer to remove all the dirt and debris that have built up on the paver. They will then use a power washer to completely clean the water surface. After this is done, you can simply have the surfaces sealed and maintained by your local company.

By hiring a company to perform regular maintenance on your asphalt paver, you will be able to prevent some very common problems. For instance, if you find that the pavers have cracks, you can ask your local maintenance company to repair these cracks before they become larger. You can also ask them to apply new asphalt once a year. If you forget to do this, the asphalt will eventually wear out and begin to crack again. By properly maintaining your asphalt paver, you will be able to save yourself money in the long run because you will not have to call maintenance on a regular basis.

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About Johns Creek, Georgia

In the early 19th century, the Johns Creek area was dotted with trading posts along the Chattahoochee River in what was then Cherokee territory. The Cherokee nation at the time was a confederacy of agrarian villages led by a chief. However, after Europeans colonized the area, the Cherokee developed an alphabet, and a legislature and judiciary system patterned after the American model.

Some trading posts gradually became crossroads communities where pioneer families – Rogers, McGinnis, Findley, Buice, Cowart, Medlock and others – gathered to visit and sell their crops.

By 1820, the community of Sheltonville (now known as Shakerag) was a ferry crossing site, with the McGinnis Ferry and Rogers Ferry carrying people and livestock across the river for a small fee. Further south, the Nesbit Ferry did the same near another crossroads community known as Newtown.

In the 1820s, the discovery of gold in the foothills of northeast Georgia within the Cherokee Nation – approximately 45 miles (72 km) north of today's Johns Creek – led to America's first Gold Rush, the eventual takeover of the Cherokee Nation by the U.S. government in 1830, and the subsequent forced exile (the "Trail of Tears") of Cherokee Indians to Oklahoma and other areas of the American West.

A few Cherokees remained, the most famous being Sarah Cordery (1785–1842), the half-blood Cherokee wife of pioneer John Rogers (1774–1851), and their 12 children. Rogers was a respected, influential plantation owner and colleague of President Andrew Jackson. Rogers's 1828 home – today, a private residence in Johns Creek – was an overnight stop-over for Jackson. Much later, the home was also visited by famed humorist Will Rogers, the great, great-nephew of John Rogers. Johns Creek's name comes from John Rogers's son, Johnson K. Rogers. A local tributary was named after him, and the name "Johns Creek" eventually came to be the name of the area.

In 1831, much of the land in the former Cherokee Nation north of the Chattahoochee was combined into the massive Cherokee County. When Milton County was formed in 1858, the Johns Creek area was folded into it.

In the 1930s, during the Great Depression, Milton County was dissolved and all of its land was then absorbed into Fulton County.

The four main crossroad communities — Ocee, Newtown, Shakerag and Warsaw — remained the social, educational and business centers of rural, unincorporated northeast Fulton County. For the next 50 years, these communities helped bring a sense of identity to this largely undeveloped and underpopulated area, as the nearby cities of Roswell, Alpharetta, Duluth and Suwanee and adjoining Forsyth and Gwinnett counties continued to grow and develop.

In 1981, a group of Georgia Institute of Technology graduates bought 1,700 acres (6.9 km) of farmland and woods near McGinnis Ferry and Medlock Bridge Roads for a high-tech office park. The new office park was to mirror one built in 1970 in nearby Peachtree Corners, known as Technology Park/Atlanta. Spotting tiny Johns Creek on an old map, they named their mixed-use, master-planned community "Technology Park/Johns Creek". This is the first reference to Johns Creek as a place. The area grew over the years to become the home of 200 companies – many of them Fortune 500 firms – with nearly 11,000 people spread over 6,000,000 square feet (560,000 m2) of office, retail and industrial space. With the jobs came houses and shopping centers, and the population increased to about 60,000.

By 2000, a grassroots movement to incorporate the Johns Creek area into a city was slowly developing. Residents wanted more control over issues such as traffic, growth, development and quality of life. They also sought a level of service that was a challenge for the sprawling Fulton County to provide. Following the nearby city of Sandy Springs’ successful incorporation in 2005, a legislative campaign was started to incorporate the Johns Creek community. House Bill 1321 was passed by the state legislature, signed by Gov. Sonny Perdue in March 2006, and approved by the residents of northeast Fulton County in a July 18, 2006 voter referendum. In November 2006, the city's first elected officials were voted into office, with the City of Johns Creek becoming official December 1, 2006.

Newtown Elementary School, built in 1929, is Johns Creek's only listing on the National Register of Historic Places. It was listed in August 2006, with location described as "near Alpharetta", before Johns Creek's incorporation was completed.

In 2017, an iHeartJC initiative has been growing to have the city's residential, business and innovation ecosystem develop a long-term strength and identity in healthcare innovation and wellness. The resolution passed a year later.

Johns Creek is located in northeastern Fulton County and is centered at 34°1′44″N 84°11′55″W / 34.02889°N 84.19861°W / 34.02889; -84.19861 (34.0289259, -84.1985790). The elevation ranges from 880 feet (270 m) above sea level along the Chattahoochee River to 1,180 feet (360 m) in the Ocee area along the Alpharetta border. Johns Creek is bounded to the south by the Chattahoochee River and Gwinnett County, and on the northeast by McGinnis Ferry Road and Forsyth County. It is bounded by Roswell to the west, Alpharetta to the northwest, Suwanee to the east, and Duluth, Berkeley Lake, and Peachtree Corners to the south. Downtown Atlanta is 27 miles (43 km) to the southwest.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the city of Johns Creek has a total area of 31.3 square miles (81.0 km), of which 30.7 square miles (79.6 km2) is land and 0.54 square miles (1.4 km), or 1.76%, is water.

Johns Creek has a humid subtropical climate (Köppen climate classification Cfa).

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 82,453 people, 28,638 households, and 23,283 families residing in the city.

According to the 2010 U.S. census, 76,728 people live in the city of Johns Creek, a 27.1 percent increase since a 2000 estimate for Georgia's 10th largest city. The racial makeup of the city in the 2010 U.S. census was 63.5 percent White; 23.4 percent Asian (8.4% Asian Indian, 6.5% Korean, 5.7% Chinese, 0.5% Vietnamese, 0.5% Japanese, 0.5% Pakistani, 0.4% Filipino, 0.1% Bangladeshi, 0.1% Indonesian, 0.1% Thai, 0.1% Cambodian, 0.1% Laotian); 9.2 percent African American; 5.2 percent Hispanic or Latino of any race (1.6% Mexican, 0.8% Puerto Rican, 0.7% Colombian, 0.4% Cuban, 0.2% Peruvian, 0.2% Dominican, 0.2% Venezuelan, 0.1% Guatemalan, 0.1% Honduran, 0.1% Salvadoran, 0.1% Chilean, 0.1% Argentinean, 0.1% Ecuadorian, 0.1% Spanish); 0.1 percent Native American; 1.4 percent from other races; and 2.4 percent from two or more races.

Johns Creek's 2010 demographics showed an estimated $109,576 median household income, a $137,271 average household income and a $45,570 per capita income.