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About Asphalt Overlay

Protect and Beautify Your Existing Pavement With An Asphalt Overlay

When existing asphalt pavement is cracked and damaged, asphalt overlays can be an effective alternative to complete reconstruction. Buckhead Asphalt will stabilize and repair existing pavement where needed and overlay it with a beautiful new asphalt surface. We can perform asphalt overlays on small to large commercial lots and driveways.

Our paving crews are highly experienced and craftsman at providing the most beautifully constructed asphalt surface for your home or business. Impress your clients and friends with a Buckhead Paving asphalt overlay.

Asphalt overlays are a great way to improve the appearance and functionality of your driveway. By applying an overlay to your asphalt surface, you can correct any damage that has been done to the surface, fill in any cracks or potholes, and give your surface a new and fresh look.

There are a number of benefits to having this method of pavement maintenance, including:

  • Improving the appearance of your driveway or parking lot.
  • Filling in cracks and potholes to prevent further damage to the surface.
  • Increase the lifespan of your driveway or parking lot by protecting it from the elements.
  • Provide a smooth, level surface for vehicles to drive on.

The cost of an asphalt overlay process will vary depending on the size of the area being covered and the condition of the surface. In general, you can expect to pay anywhere from $2 to $10 per square foot.
The first step of the asphalt overlay process is to clean the surface of your driveway or parking lot. This will help the new asphalt to adhere properly and will also prevent any dirt or debris from becoming trapped under the new layer. Once the surface is clean, the contractor will repair any cracks or potholes. Finally, the area is graded so that water will drain away from the surface.

After the asphalt has been applied, it will need to cure for 24 hours before it can be used. Once it’s cured, you’ll have a smooth, level surface that is ready for use.

So when is the best time to get an asphalt overlay? That depends on your individual situation. But typically, the overlays should be applied when the surface is in good condition and there is no significant damage that needs to be repaired.

And as with any new asphalt surface, it is important to take some precautions to ensure that your overlay lasts for many years. Some of the things you can do to care for your new asphalt surface include:

  • Avoid driving when the surface is wet.
  • Don’t allow oil or grease to spill on the surface.
  • Park in the same spot so that the weight of your car(s) doesn’t cause excessive wear and tear.
  • Sweep the surface regularly to remove any dirt.
  • Apply a sealant to the surface every few years to protect it from the elements.

If you are considering an asphalt overlay project for your driveway or parking lot, be sure to consult with a contractor who can help choose the right overlay for your needs. By choosing the right contractor, you can enjoy all the benefits of an asphalt overlay for many years to come.

When it comes to choosing a contractor, it is important to do your research. There are a number of factors you’ll need to consider including the contractor’s experience and reputation, as well as the cost of the project.

It’s also important to make sure that the contractor is licensed and insured. By choosing a reputable contractor like Buckhead Paving & Construction, you can be sure that your asphalt overlay project will be done right the first time.

And if you’re not sure where to start, you can ask for recommendations from friends or family members who have had an asphalt overlay done. Once you’ve found a few contractors to consider, be sure to get quotes from each one so that you can compare costs.

Moreover, be sure to ask about the process for an asphalt overlay. The contractor should be able to give you a timeline for the project and explain what you can expect during and after the installation.

By taking the time to choose the right contractor and understand the process, you can be assured that your asphalt overlay will be a success.

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About Chamblee, Georgia

The area that would later become Chamblee was originally dairy farms. During the late nineteenth century, an intersection of two railroads was constructed in Chamblee; one carried passengers from Atlanta to Charlotte, North Carolina, while the other ferried workers and goods back and forth from a factory in Roswell to Atlanta. A settlement known as Roswell Junction emerged at the intersection, and the United States Postal Service decided to establish a post office there. However, feeling the name of the settlement was too similar to nearby Roswell, they randomly selected Chamblee from a list of petitioners for the new post office name. Chamblee was incorporated in 1907.

During World War I and World War II, Chamblee served as the site of U.S. military operations. During World War I, the U.S. operated Camp Gordon, home to 40,000 servicemen. This influx of new people created a building boom in the town. Camp Gordon was closed after the war and then re-opened as Navy Flight Training Center at the advent of World War II.

Immediately after World War II, Chamblee experienced growth in blue-collar industry and residents due to its proximity to the newly opened General Motors plant in neighboring Doraville. Manufacturing plants also located along the newly constructed Peachtree Industrial Boulevard. By the 1980s, much of the city's industrial base had downsized or eroded; in its place sprung multi-ethnic businesses that catered to the immigrants and refugees moving to Chamblee and Doraville en masse due to the cities' affordable housing. By the time of the 1996 Summer Olympics, Chamblee had emerged as a multi-cultural city inhabited by a large immigrant community.

During the first decade of the 2000s, the city grew as it refined its image, constructing a new city hall in 2002. In 2010, Chamblee annexed an area directly to the northwest that includes Huntley Hills and a resident population of approximately 5,000. It also renamed Peachtree Industrial Boulevard to Peachtree Boulevard, and took steps to revitalize its downtown.In 2012 the city had an annexation proposal that was voted down by a small margin. In November 2013 the city had another annexation proposal that was passed by voters.Circa 2014 the city and Brookhaven had a dispute over which city will annex the Century Center development. The courts gave Century Center to Chamblee.

According to 2020 Census data, Chamblee effectively tripled its population since 2010. It started the decade with roughly 9,800 residents and ended it with more than 30,000, mostly due to two annexations. The only city to gain more residents in that time was Atlanta, and only two Georgia cities — Morgan and Pendergrass — grew at faster rates over the past decade.City leaders have credited Chamblee’s location as a transportation hub, with close proximity to two interstates, a MARTA station and the Peachtree-DeKalb Airport, as a key reason for the city’s growth. Chamblee has recently attracted multiple mixed-use developments and office projects.

Chamblee is south of Dunwoody, southwest of Doraville, northeast of Brookhaven, and north of Interstate 85. The city is located at 33°53′15″N 84°18′19″W / 33.88750°N 84.30528°W / 33.88750; -84.30528 (33.887552, -84.305326). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.1 square miles (8.0 km2), all land.

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 30,164 people, 11,526 households, and 5,488 families residing in the city. The racial and ethnic composition of population was 31.23% white. 13.36% Black or African American, .19% Native American, 8.62% Asian or Pacific Islander, 3.13% with one or more races unidentified. 43.48% of Chamblee residents are Hispanic or Latino.

From 2010 to 2020, the population inside Chamblee had tripled. Influx into Chamblee was spread among identified ethnic groups. More Asian and African-American people moved into Chamblee compared to the other races.

As of the 2010 Census Chamblee had a population of 9,892. The racial and ethnic composition of the population was 45.0% white (19.0% non-Hispanic white), 7.0% black or African American (6.2% non-Hispanic black), 2.1% Native American (0.2% non-Hispanic Native American), 8.0% Asian (1.8% Vietnamese, 1.6% Asian Indian, 4.6% other Asian), 33.5% from some other race (0.2% non-Hispanic from some other race) and 4.1% reporting two or more races. 58.5% of the population was Hispanic or Latino of any race.

As of the census of 2000, there were 9,552 people, 2,673 households, and 1,849 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,043.3 inhabitants per square mile (1,175.0/km2). There were 2,730 housing units at an average density of 869.8 per square mile (335.8/km). The racial makeup of the city was 45.36% White, 3.71% African American, 0.91% Native American, 13.98% Asian, 0.32% Pacific Islander, 31.45% from other races, and 4.27% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 56.37% of the population.

There were 2,673 households, out of which 33.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.4% were married couples living together, 9.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.8% were non-families. 15.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 4.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.57 and the average family size was 3.65.

In the city, the population was spread out, with 23.2% under the age of 18, 17.9% from 18 to 24, 41.0% from 25 to 44, 12.8% from 45 to 64, and 5.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 28 years. For every 100 females, there were 161.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 176.9 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $45,992. Males had a median income of $22,024 versus $22,368 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,492. About 15.8% of families and 22.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 25.2% of those under age 18 and 7.8% of those age 65 or over. In addition, 16.7% of families reported a household income higher than $100,000.